Does Rosemary Have Nootropic Benefits?


rosemary

It is a perennial herb that is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae and is known as rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). And it’s used all over the world, in both food and medicine, to keep people healthy.

Rosemary is a herb that originated in the Mediterranean and is now grown all over the world. It has been used as a nootropic for years to help people who suffer from memory loss.

Aside from that, it can be used to treat a variety of conditions including hypertension, headaches, insomnia, and diseases of the respiratory system.

A variety of ailments, such as arthritis, dandruff, and skin diseases, are treated with rosemary, which also has the added benefit of promoting hair growth.

The potential of Rosemary as a nootropic and cognitive enhancer will be discussed in greater detail in the following section.

What is Rosemary?

Fresh rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a fragrant herb with needle-shaped leaves that was originally cultivated in the Mediterranean and northern Asia.

As early as 500 B.C., the Greeks and Romans were using rosemary as a medicinal herb. Traditionally, Greek students wore rosemary headbands to help them recall their test-taking memory during the exam.

The scientific name for the plant, Rosmarinus, is derived from the Latin words ros, which means “dew,” and maris, which means “of the sea” (marinus).

After fleeing Egypt, the Virgin Mary is said to have sought refuge under a Rosemary bush, according to legend. When she draped her blue cape over the white flowers of a Rosemary bush, the flowers turned blue. The herb rosemary, also known as the ‘rose of Mary,’ was given its name as a result of its association with Mary.

Many traditional dishes call for the flavor and aroma of rosemary, which has a bitter aftertaste and can be found in a variety of culinary preparations. Rosemary can be found in a variety of forms, including fresh leaves, powder, and essential oil.

Rosemary has been used to treat a wide range of ailments for thousands of years, including pain relief, memory enhancement, immunity enhancement, and hair growth promotion, among others.

Among the many nutrients found in rosemary are calcium, iron, B vitamins A, B6, and C, as well as the antioxidants vitamin E and carotenoids. Furthermore, it possesses potent antifungal and antibacterial properties as well.

Rosemary oil contains compounds that have been shown to help with memory improvement in studies. The compound 1,8-cineole, which acts as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, increases the amount of acetylcholine in the brain. It’s similar to the medications that are prescribed to people who are suffering from dementia.

In a 2013 study conducted at Mahidol University in Bangkok, researchers looked into the effects of rosemary essential oil on the human central nervous system.

The inhalation of the aroma of Rosemary essential oil was tested on a total of 20 healthy volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 28 years of age. After inhaling the oil, an EEG revealed that alpha brain waves decreased and beta brain waves increased, indicating that the oil had an effect on the brain.

This change in brain wave activity resulted in increased alertness and improved cognitive function. Researchers discovered that inhaling the aroma of Rosemary essential oil has stimulant properties, which they discovered in a study.

It has also been demonstrated that rosemary essential oil is a stress-relieving agent. It works by lowering the levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the bloodstream.

Rosemary stimulates brain wave activity, the autonomic nervous system, and mood, according to research.

What is the mechanism by which Rosemary affects the brain?

Rosemary benefits the brain in a variety of ways. However, there are two that stand out.

  • Rosemary enhances memory – Rosemary has long been used to boost mental acuity and well-being. In addition, clinical studies have corroborated these claims in the past few years.
    Study participants included 144 people from the UK’s University of Northumbria. Rosemary essential oil inhalation improved memory and mood in this study’s participants.

A study with 66 adults was conducted in 2013 by Jemma McCready and Dr. Mark Moss from the University of Northumbria. Trial participants were asked to remember things that would happen in the future or were essential for daily functioning as part of their prospective memory.

There was a Rosemary essential oil-infused test room and a control room for comparison.

According to the findings, participants in the Rosemary-scented room outperformed the control group by 60 to 75 percent on tasks requiring prospective memory.

They presented their findings at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference in Brighton in 2017 by the same team of investigators.

To see if Rosemary had the same effect on children, researchers recruited 40 of them between the ages of 10 and 11 for a follow-up study.

Again, one group was tested in a room infused with Rosemary oil, while the other was placed in a room without any scent.

Children in the Rosemary-scented room outperformed those in the control group by 5 to 7 percent on tests of working memory.

  • Rosemary has been shown to be neuroprotective due to its high concentration of phenolic diterpenes and triterpene acids, both of which are known neuroprotectors.

Rosemary’s phenolic compounds have been shown in animal studies to reduce oxidative stress. Ischemic stroke caused less brain damage in animals that had received a pre-treatment of Rosemary.

And because the blood-brain barrier remained intact, they made a full recovery with improved neurological scores.

Traditional and modern medicine have both used rosemary extract for its pain-relieving properties. Terpenoids, and to a lesser extent rosmarinic acid, have been shown in studies to significantly reduce pain sensitivity.

Rosmarin protects nerve fibers by preventing the loss of myelin and axon diameter, which are both important for neuron health. Helps glial cells and astrocytes that are involved in pain maintenance remain plastic.

Preventing pain and nervous system changes as a result of nerve injury.

There is evidence to suggest that rosemary’s anti-neuropathic properties are due to its ability to bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, polypeptides that respond to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

Rosemary reduces neuropathic hypersensitivity and protects nerve tissue when it binds to these receptors.

Why do things go wrong?

  • As a person grows older, their energy metabolism and brain chemistry change.
  • Having the ability to pay attention and concentrate, along with mental agility, diminishes as we grow older.
  • When brain cells are exposed to the elements, their membranes deteriorate.
  • It has been discovered that the amount of acetylcholine in the brain is decreasing.
  • Free radicals cause oxidative stress in brain cells, which causes them to die.

All of these aging-related changes contribute to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia as well.

Rosemary, on the other hand, can help even if you’re not particularly concerned about the ravages of time.

For thousands of years, people have used the herb rosemary to keep their brains healthy and functioning properly.

The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of rosemary make it a useful herb for treating various ailments.

Rosemary has been shown to improve memory and concentration when taken orally.

Simply inhaling the scent of Rosemary can improve your memory.

In a cubicle scented with Rosemary, 20 healthy volunteers performed subtraction and visual processing tasks. Before and after the test, participants’ moods were evaluated.

The researchers also collected blood samples as part of the investigation.

According to the findings, exposure to the Rosemary aroma improved both performance and concentration.

As 1,8-cineole levels in the blood dropped, so did speed and accuracy, as well as feelings of contentment.

Acetylcholine deficiency has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia. Rosemary increases brain acetylcholine by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity.

Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) formed when amyloid- proteins aggregate cause memory loss in people with Alzheimer’s and dementia. Amyloid- plaque formation is inhibited by the carnosic acid in Rosemary.

Rosemary’s additional nootropic benefits include improved cognition, increased alertness, and reduced anxiety.

Use of Rosemary as a nootropic enhances cognition by acting as a cognitive stimulant.

The mood, stress, and episodes of cortisol imbalance are all reduced in people who use Rosemary essential oil.

Rosemary supplementation has been linked to improved immunity and circulation, according to some users. Likely because of the high concentration of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds found in the plant.

Rosemary is also popular among neurohackers, who use it as a seasoning agent in a food or as a herbal tea. It has a delightful flavor and aroma that instantly energizes you.

 

Results of the Studies

Studies on Rosemary‘s effect on general brain health have been done in addition to the memory-boosting studies mentioned earlier.

Rosemary has been shown to improve cognitive function.
The aroma of essential oils affected human behavior, according to researchers at Northumbria University in Newcastle upon Tyne.

A cubicle infused with 4 drops of Rosemary essential oil housed 20 healthy volunteers who performed serial subtraction and visual information processing tasks.

A mood assessment was conducted both before and after the testing session, and blood samples were collected at the conclusion of the procedure.

Researchers found a link between cognitive performance and blood levels of the antioxidant 1,8-cineole derived from Rosemary, which can be obtained by simply inhaling the herb’s aroma.

As 1,8-cineole concentrations increased, so did the performance. As a result, both speed and accuracy improved.

 

Information on dosage

It has been demonstrated that rosemary leaf can provide nootropic benefits when taken at a dose of 750 mg per day.

A 275 mg daily dose of rosemary extract contains 20 percent rosmarinic acid, 20 percent diterpenes, and 9 percent carnosic acid, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

Whenever needed, add 1 mL (15-30 drops) of rosemary essential oil to a diffuser.

 

 

Symptoms and side effects

The herb rosemary is considered to be non-toxic and completely safe when used as a nootropic when followed by the manufacturer’s instructions.

People have been using rosemary as a food condiment since the dawn of time, and it is a perennial. As a result, the vast majority of people should be able to tolerate nootropics with little difficulty.

A study conducted on rats showed that rosemary can lower sperm count in male rats and cause fetuses to be aborted in female rats when administered topically.

It’s important to remember, however, that the dosage of Rosemary in rats ranged between 250 and 500 mg/kg of body weight, depending on the species. It is necessary to use much higher doses of the nootropic than we would normally use. According to the findings of this study, the authors of this study attributed these side effects to testosterone reductions caused by high-dose Rosemary consumption.

If you are taking blood-thinning medication, you should avoid using Rosemary as much as possible. ACE inhibitors, which are used to treat high blood pressure, are also available as an alternative treatment.

Humans have experienced vomiting, uterine bleeding, kidney irritation, increased sun sensitivity, skin redness, and allergic reactions after ingesting Rosemary essential oil in high concentrations.

You should avoid taking Rosemary as a nootropic supplement while you are pregnant because it has been shown to cause miscarriage. If you are nursing your child, you should use Rosemary sparingly.

For people who are diabetic, pre-diabetic, or have diabetes-related insulin resistance, it is recommended that they avoid taking Rosemary as a nootropic.

Use of Rosemary should be avoided if you are undergoing chemotherapy treatment.

 

In Summary

Rosemary is a herb that originated in the Mediterranean and is now grown all over the world. It has been used as a nootropic for years to help people who suffer from memory loss.

Rosemary can also treat a variety of ailments, such as arthritis, dandruff, and skin diseases. R

Rosemary oil contains compounds that have been shown to help with memory improvement. Researchers discovered that inhaling the aroma of Rosemary essential oil has stimulant properties.

The oil also acts as a stress-relieving agent, lowering the levels of cortisol in the bloodstream.

Rosemary has been shown to be neuroprotective due to its high concentration of phenolic diterpenes and triterpene acids, both of which are known neuroprotectors.

Rosemary reduces neuropathic hypersensitivity and protects nerve tissue when it binds to nerve receptors. The use of Rosemary as a nootropic enhances cognition by acting as a cognitive stimulant.

Researchers found a link between cognitive performance and blood levels of the antioxidant 1,8-cineole derived from Rosemary.

Exposure to the Rosemary aroma improved both performance and concentration.

A study conducted on rats showed that rosemary can lower sperm count in male rats and cause fetuses to be aborted in female rats. If you are taking blood-thinning medication, you should avoid using Rosemary as much as possible.

Use of Rosemary should be avoided if you are undergoing chemotherapy treatment.

 

References:

  • https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10641130/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4749867/#sec3title
  • https://www.researchgate.net/publication/298124139_The_historical_evolution_of_the_medicinal_use_of_rosemary_Rosmarinus_officinalis_L_a_Spanish_panacea

 

 

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